Actors

Description

Play parts in stage, television, radio, video, motion picture productions, or other settings for entertainment, information, or instruction. Interpret serious or comic role by speech, gesture, and body movement to entertain or inform audience. May dance and sing.

Tasks

  • Study and rehearse roles from scripts in order to interpret, learn and memorize lines, stunts, and cues as directed.
  • Work closely with directors, other actors, and playwrights to find the interpretation most suited to the role.
  • Learn about characters in scripts and their relationships to each other in order to develop role interpretations.
  • Collaborate with other actors as part of an ensemble.
  • Perform humorous and serious interpretations of emotions, actions, and situations, using body movements, facial expressions, and gestures.
  • Attend auditions and casting calls in order to audition for roles.
  • Portray and interpret roles, using speech, gestures, and body movements in order to entertain, inform, or instruct radio, film, television, or live audiences.
  • Work with other crewmembers responsible for lighting, costumes, makeup, and props.
  • Sing and/or dance during dramatic or comedic performances.
  • Read from scripts or books to narrate action or to inform or entertain audiences, utilizing few or no stage props.
  • Promote productions using means such as interviews about plays or movies.
  • Write original or adapted material for dramas, comedies, puppet shows, narration, or other performances.
  • Prepare and perform action stunts for motion picture, television, or stage productions.
  • Tell jokes, perform comic dances, songs and skits, impersonate mannerisms and voices of others, contort face, and use other devices to amuse audiences.
  • Introduce performances and performers in order to stimulate excitement and coordinate smooth transition of acts during events.
  • Manipulate strings, wires, rods, or fingers to animate puppets or dummies in synchronization with talking, singing, or recorded programs.
  • Dress in comical clown costumes and makeup, and perform comedy routines to entertain audiences.
  • Perform original and stock tricks of illusion to entertain and mystify audiences, occasionally including audience members as participants.
  • Construct puppets and ventriloquist dummies, and sew accessory clothing, using hand tools and machines.

Knowledge

Public Safety and Security
Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
Biology
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Physics
Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

Skills

Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Operation Monitoring
Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.

Abilities

Number Facility
The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Mathematical Reasoning
The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Acrobat
Acting Teacher
Actor
Actress
Aerialist
Amusement Park Entertainer
Aquatic Performer
Artistic Director
Circus Clown
Clown
Comedian
Comic
Community Theater Actor
Diver
Double
Dramatic Reader
Elocutionist
Ensemble Director
Extra
Impersonator
Impresario
Juggler
Magician
Mime
Minstrel
Monologist
Motion Picture Actor
Movie Actor
Movie Star
Movie Stunt Performer
Narrator
Puppeteer
Ring Conductor
Second
Show Girl
Soubrette
Stand Up Comedian
Stand-In
Stunt Driver
Stunt Performer
Stunt Person
Stunt Woman
Television Actor
Theatre Ensemble Member
Theatrical Performer
Theatrical Trouper
Thrill Performer
Understudy
Vaudeville Actor
Ventriloquist
Voice-Over Artist
Wire Walker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$20.26 hourly, $0 annual.
Employment (2008):
70,540 employees