Camera Operators, Television, Video, and Motion Picture

Description

Operate television, video, or motion picture camera to record images or scenes for various purposes, such as TV broadcasts, advertising, video production, or motion pictures.

Tasks

  • Operate television or motion picture cameras to record scenes for television broadcasts, advertising, or motion pictures.
  • Compose and frame each shot, applying the technical aspects of light, lenses, film, filters, and camera settings to achieve the effects sought by directors.
  • Edit video for broadcast productions, including non-linear editing.
  • Adjust positions and controls of cameras, printers, and related equipment to change focus, exposure, and lighting.
  • Confer with directors, sound and lighting technicians, electricians, and other crew members to discuss assignments and determine filming sequences, desired effects, camera movements, and lighting requirements.
  • Set up and perform live shots for broadcast.
  • Set up cameras, optical printers, and related equipment to produce photographs and special effects.
  • Assemble studio sets, and select and arrange cameras, film stock, audio, or lighting equipment to be used during filming.
  • Test, clean, maintain, and repair broadcast equipment, including testing microphones, to ensure proper working condition.
  • Use cameras in any of several different camera mounts such as stationary, track-mounted, or crane-mounted.
  • Observe sets or locations for potential problems and to determine filming and lighting requirements.
  • View films to resolve problems of exposure control, subject and camera movement, changes in subject distance, and related variables.
  • Stay current with new technologies in the field by reading trade magazines.
  • Operate zoom lenses, changing images according to specifications and rehearsal instructions.
  • Download exposed film for shipment to processing labs.
  • Reload camera magazines with fresh raw film stock.
  • Set up and operate electric news gathering (ENG) microwave vehicles to gather and edit raw footage on location to send to television affiliates for broadcast.
  • Instruct camera operators regarding camera setups, angles, distances, movement, and variables and cues for starting and stopping filming.
  • Label and record contents of exposed film, and note details on report forms.
  • Direct studio productions.
  • Receive raw film stock, and maintain film inventories.
  • Read and analyze work orders and specifications to determine locations of subject material, work procedures, sequences of operations, and machine setups.
  • Read charts and compute ratios to determine variables such as lighting, shutter angles, filter factors, and camera distances.
  • Prepare slates that describe the scenes being filmed.
  • Design graphics for studio productions.
  • Write new scripts for broadcasts.

Skills

Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Lay Titles

Advanced Electronic Field Production Specialist (Advanced EFP Specialist)
Animation Camera Operator
Broadcast Engineer
Camera Engineer
Camera Operator
Camera Person
Cameraman
Cinematographer
Commercial Producer
Commercial Production Editor
Creative Services Director
Director
Director of Photography
Electronic News Gathering Camera-Person (ENG Camera-Person)
Field Producer
Floor Director
Master Control Operator (MCO)
Media Technician
Motion Picture Cameraman
Motion Picture Photographer
Movie Shot Cameraman
News Cameraman
News Reel Cameraman
News Videographer
Newscast Director
Optical Effects Camera Operator
Photographer
Photojournalist
Producer
Production Assistant
Production Manager
Production Technician
Special Effects Designer
Studio Camera Operator
Technical Director
Television Cameraman
Television News Photographer
Television Producer
Television Production Assistant
Television Production Technician
Title Camera Operator
Truck Operator
Video Camera Operator
Video Coordinator
Video Operator
Video Photographer
Video Producer
Videographer
Videotape Editor
Wild Life Photographer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$19.38 hourly, $40,300 annual.
Employment (2008):
16,410 employees