Directors- Stage, Motion Pictures, Television, and Radio

Description

Interpret script, conduct rehearsals, and direct activities of cast and technical crew for stage, motion pictures, television, or radio programs.

Tasks

  • Supervise and coordinate the work of camera, lighting, design, and sound crewmembers.
  • Plan details such as framing, composition, camera movement, sound, and actor movement for each shot or scene.
  • Direct live broadcasts, films and recordings, or non-broadcast programming for public entertainment or education.
  • Confer with technical directors, managers, crew members, and writers to discuss details of production, such as photography, script, music, sets, and costumes.
  • Compile cue words and phrases, and cue announcers, cast members, and technicians during performances.
  • Establish pace of programs and sequences of scenes according to time requirements and cast and set accessibility.
  • Identify and approve equipment and elements required for productions, such as scenery, lights, props, costumes, choreography, and music.
  • Consult with writers, producers, or actors about script changes, or "workshop" scripts, through rehearsal with writers and actors to create final drafts.
  • Select plays or scripts for production, and determine how material should be interpreted and performed.
  • Study and research scripts to determine how they should be directed.
  • Communicate to actors the approach, characterization, and movement needed for each scene in such a way that rehearsals and takes are minimized.
  • Collaborate with producers to hire crewmembers such as art directors, cinematographers, and costumer designers.
  • Collaborate with film and sound editors during the post-production process as films are edited and soundtracks are added.
  • Create graphics for television broadcasts.
  • Choose settings and locations for films and determine how scenes will be shot in these settings.
  • Cut and edit film or tape to integrate component parts into desired sequences.
  • Interpret stage-set diagrams to determine stage layouts, and supervise placement of equipment and scenery.
  • Confer with stage managers to arrange schedules for rehearsals, costume fittings, and sound/light development.
  • Hold auditions for parts or negotiate contracts with actors determined suitable for specific roles, working in conjunction with producers.
  • Compile scripts, program notes, and other material related to productions.
  • Review film daily to check on work in progress and to plan for future filming.
  • Create and approve storyboards in conjunction with art directors.
  • Promote and market productions by giving interviews, participating in talk shows, and making other public appearances.
  • Perform producers' duties such as securing financial backing, establishing and administering budgets, and recruiting cast and crew.
  • Introduce plays, and meet with audiences after shows to explain how the play was interpreted.

Skills

Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.

Interests

Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.

Work Values

Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Commercial Director
Creative Director
Director
Drama Director
Dramatic Coach
Dramatic Director
Editor
Independent Film Maker
Motion Picture Director
Music Video Director
News Production Supervisor
Newscast Director
Producer
Program Arranger
Program Coordinator
Stage Manager
Technical Director
Television Director (TV Director)
Television Newscast Director
Television Producer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$34.31 hourly, $71,350 annual.
Employment (2008):
87,010 employees