Film and Video Editors

Description

Edit moving images on film, video, or other media. May edit or synchronize soundtracks with images.

Tasks

  • Organize and string together raw footage into a continuous whole according to scripts or the instructions of directors and producers.
  • Review assembled films or edited videotapes on screens or monitors to determine if corrections are necessary.
  • Trim film segments to specified lengths, and reassemble segments in sequences that present stories with maximum effect.
  • Determine the specific audio and visual effects and music necessary to complete films.
  • Set up and operate computer editing systems, electronic titling systems, video switching equipment, and digital video effects units to produce a final product.
  • Select and combine the most effective shots of each scene to form a logical and smoothly running story.
  • Edit films and videotapes to insert music, dialogue, and sound effects, to arrange films into sequences, and to correct errors, using editing equipment.
  • Cut shot sequences to different angles at specific points in scenes, making each individual cut as fluid and seamless as possible.
  • Mark frames where a particular shot or piece of sound is to begin or end.
  • Verify key numbers and time codes on materials.
  • Record needed sounds, or obtain them from sound effects libraries.
  • Review footage sequence by sequence to become familiar with it before assembling it into a final product.
  • Confer with producers and directors concerning layout or editing approaches needed to increase dramatic or entertainment value of productions.
  • Piece sounds together to develop film soundtracks.
  • Supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in film editing, assembling, and recording activities.
  • Manipulate plot, score, sound, and graphics to make the parts into a continuous whole, working closely with people in audio, visual, music, optical or special effects departments.
  • Program computerized graphic effects.
  • Conduct film screenings for directors and members of production staffs.
  • Collaborate with music editors to select appropriate passages of music and develop production scores.
  • Study scripts to become familiar with production concepts and requirements.
  • Develop post-production models for films.
  • Estimate how long audiences watching comedies will laugh at each gag line or situation, to space scenes appropriately.
  • Discuss the sound requirements of pictures with sound effects editors.

Knowledge

Transportation
Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
Biology
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.

Skills

Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Multilimb Coordination
The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Static Strength
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.

Interests

Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

Work Values

Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Commercial Producer
Cue Selector
Director
Editor
Electronic News Gathering Editor (ENG Editor)
Film Editor Supervisor
Film or Videotape Editor
Graphic Artist
Graphic Engineer
Movie Editor
Multimedia Artist
News Editor
News Video Editor
News Videotape Editor
Non-Linear Editor
Optical Effects Layout Person
Producer
Production Manager
Sound Cutter
Special Effects Designer
Supervising Film or Videotape Editor
Tape Editor
Television News Video Editor
Video Editor
Video Tape Duplicator
Video Tape Transferrer
Videographer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$24.66 hourly, $51,300 annual.
Employment (2008):
21,500 employees