Radio and Television Announcers

Description

Speak or read from scripted materials, such as news reports or commercial messages, on radio or television. May announce artist or title of performance, identify station, or interview guests.

Tasks

  • Prepare and deliver news, sports, and/or weather reports, gathering and rewriting material so that it will convey required information and fit specific time slots.
  • Read news flashes to inform audiences of important events.
  • Identify stations, and introduce or close shows, using memorized or read scripts, and/or ad-libs.
  • Select program content, in conjunction with producers and assistants, based on factors such as program specialties, audience tastes, or requests from the public.
  • Study background information in order to prepare for programs or interviews.
  • Comment on music and other matters, such as weather or traffic conditions.
  • Interview show guests about their lives, their work, or topics of current interest.
  • Discuss various topics over the telephone with viewers or listeners.
  • Host civic, charitable, or promotional events that are broadcast over television or radio.
  • Make promotional appearances at public or private events in order to represent their employers.
  • Operate control consoles.
  • Announce musical selections, station breaks, commercials, or public service information, and accept requests from listening audience.
  • Keep daily program logs to provide information on all elements aired during broadcast, such as musical selections and station promotions.
  • Record commercials for later broadcast.
  • Locate guests to appear on talk or interview shows.
  • Describe or demonstrate products that viewers may purchase through specific shows or in stores.
  • Coordinate games, contests, or other on-air competitions, performing such duties as asking questions and awarding prizes.
  • Attend press conferences in order to gather information for broadcast.
  • Provide commentary and conduct interviews during sporting events, parades, conventions, and other events.
  • Give network cues permitting selected stations to receive programs.
  • Moderate panels or discussion shows on topics such as current affairs, art, or education.

Knowledge

Biology
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Building and Construction
Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
Chemistry
Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.
Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Mathematical Reasoning
The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
Multilimb Coordination
The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Depth Perception
The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Static Strength
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.

Interests

Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

Work Values

Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Lay Titles

Anchor
Announcer
Broadcaster
Broadcasting Specialist
Commercial Announcer
Community Liaison
Disc Jockey
FM Announcer
Game Show Host or Hostess
Host
Host/Hostess
Managing Editor
Meteorologist
Morning News Anchor
Morning Show Host
Music Director
Music Journalist
News Anchor
News Broadcaster
News Director
News Reporter
Newscaster
On-Air Announcer
On-Air Personality
Producer
Program Director
Program Host
Radio Announcer
Radio Artist
Radio Broadcaster
Radio Disc Jockey
Radio Disk Jockey (Radio DJ)
Radio Host
Radio Performer
Radio Personality
Radio Sportscaster
Radio Television Announcer (Radio TV Announcer)
Reporter
Show Host or Hostess
Sports Analyst
Sports Anchor
Sports Announcer
Sports Broadcaster
Sports Commentator
Sports Director
Sports Journalist
Sports Reporter
Sportscaster
Staff Announcer
Talk Show Host
Television Announcer (TV Announcer)
Television Host (TV Host)
Television News Anchor (TV News Anchor)
Television Reporter
Voice Over Announcer
Voice-Over Talent
Weather Anchor
Weather Reporter
Weathercaster

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$13.47 hourly, $28,020 annual.
Employment (2008):
31,340 employees