Reporters and Correspondents

Description

Collect and analyze facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation, or observation. Report and write stories for newspaper, news magazine, radio, or television.

Tasks

  • Report news stories for publication or broadcast, describing the background and details of events.
  • Arrange interviews with people who can provide information about a story.
  • Review copy and correct errors in content, grammar, and punctuation, following prescribed editorial style and formatting guidelines.
  • Review and evaluate notes taken about event aspects in order to isolate pertinent facts and details.
  • Determine a story's emphasis, length, and format, and organize material accordingly.
  • Research and analyze background information related to stories in order to be able to provide complete and accurate information.
  • Gather information about events through research, interviews, experience, or attendance at political, news, sports, artistic, social, or other functions.
  • Investigate breaking news developments, such as disasters, crimes, or human-interest stories.
  • Research and report on specialized fields such as medicine, science and technology, politics, foreign affairs, sports, arts, consumer affairs, business, religion, crime, or education.
  • Receive assignments or evaluate leads or tips to develop story ideas.
  • Discuss issues with editors to establish priorities or positions.
  • Check reference materials, such as books, news files, or public records, to obtain relevant facts.
  • Revise work to meet editorial approval or to fit time or space requirements.
  • Photograph or videotape news events, or request that a photographer be assigned to provide such coverage.
  • Develop ideas or material for columns or commentaries by analyzing and interpreting news, current issues, or personal experiences.
  • Transmit news stories or reporting information from remote locations, using equipment such as satellite phones, telephones, fax machines, or modems.
  • Present live or recorded commentary via broadcast media.
  • Conduct taped or filmed interviews or narratives.
  • Edit or assist in editing videos for broadcast.
  • Write columns, editorials, commentaries, or reviews that interpret events or offer opinions.
  • Write reviews of literary, musical, or other artwork, based on knowledge, judgment, or experience.
  • Report on green technology or environmental issues, such as pollution, energy effiency, recycling, or renewable energy.

Knowledge

Biology
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Physics
Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
Chemistry
Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.
Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.

Abilities

Hearing Sensitivity
The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Multilimb Coordination
The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.

Work Activities

Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment
Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment
Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
Staffing Organizational Units
Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization.
Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment
Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

Interests

Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

Work Values

Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Anchor
Art Critic
Book Critic
Book Reviewer
Broadcast Journalist
Bureau Chief
Bureau Reporter
Business Reporter
Business Writer
Columnist
Consumer Reporter
Copy Editor
Correspondent
Court Reporter
Courtroom Reporter
Critic
Cub Reporter
Desk Reporter
Dramatic Critic
Editor
Editorial Writer
Education Reporter
Feature Reporter
Feature Writer
Film Critic
Financial Writer
Food Critic
Foreign Correspondent
General Assignment Reporter
General Assignment Television News Reporter
Headline Writer
Health and Medical Reporter
Investigative Reporter
Journalist
Law Reporter
Leg Man
Magazine Journalist
Magazine Writer
Managing Editor
Marine Reporter
Market News Reporter
Market Reporter
Media Analyst
Meteorologist
Motion Picture Critic
Movie Critic
Music Critic
Music Journalist
News Correspondent
News Director
News Editor
News Producer
News Reporter
News Specialist
News Writer
Newspaper Columnist
Newspaper Correspondent
Newspaper Journalist
Newspaper Reporter
Newspaper Writer
Photographer
Police Reporter
Political Reporter
Press Writer
Print Journalist
Producer
Radio News Writer
Reporter
Society Reporter
Sports Analyst
Sports Anchor
Sports Editor
Sports Journalist
Sports Reporter
Sports Writer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$17.25 hourly, $35,870 annual.
Employment (2008):
45,570 employees