Surveying Technicians

Description

Adjust and operate surveying instruments, such as the theodolite and electronic distance-measuring equipment, and compile notes, make sketches and enter data into computers.

Tasks

  • Adjust and operate surveying instruments such as prisms, theodolites, and electronic distance-measuring equipment.
  • Perform calculations to determine earth curvature corrections, atmospheric impacts on measurements, traverse closures and adjustments, azimuths, level runs, and placement of markers.
  • Record survey measurements and descriptive data using notes, drawings, sketches, and inked tracings.
  • Search for section corners, property irons, and survey points.
  • Position and hold the vertical rods, or targets, that theodolite operators use for sighting to measure angles, distances, and elevations.
  • Lay out grids, and determine horizontal and vertical controls.
  • Compare survey computations with applicable standards to determine adequacy of data.
  • Set out and recover stakes, marks, and other monumentation.
  • Direct and supervise work of subordinate members of surveying parties.
  • Conduct surveys to ascertain the locations of natural features and man-made structures on the Earth's surface, underground, and underwater using electronic distance-measuring equipment and other surveying instruments.
  • Compile information necessary to stake projects for construction, using engineering plans.
  • Prepare topographic and contour maps of land surveyed, including site features and other relevant information such as charts, drawings, and survey notes.
  • Place and hold measuring tapes when electronic distance-measuring equipment is not used.
  • Collect information needed to carry out new surveys using source maps, previous survey data, photographs, computer records, and other relevant information.
  • Operate and manage land-information computer systems, performing tasks such as storing data, making inquiries, and producing plots and reports.
  • Run rods for benches and cross-section elevations.
  • Perform manual labor, such as cutting brush for lines, carrying stakes, rebar, and other heavy items, and stacking rods.
  • Maintain equipment and vehicles used by surveying crews.
  • Provide assistance in the development of methods and procedures for conducting field surveys.

Knowledge

Philosophy and Theology
Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Assistant Surveyor
C Level Crew Chief
CAD Technician (Computer Assisted Design Technician)
Chain Carrier
Chain Person
Chain, Rod, or Ax Survey Worker
Chainman
Compass Operator
Engineering Assistant
Engineering Physical Science Technician
Engineering Technician
Field Crew Chief
Field Supervisor
Geophysical Party Chief
Instrument Man (I-Man)
Instrument Operator
Instrument Person
Land Survey Technician
Land Surveying Survey Worker
Land Surveyor
Levelman
Marine Surveyor
Party Chief
River and Harbor Soundings Group Leader
Rodman
Stake Driver
Stake Setter
Staker
Survey Crew Chief
Survey Crew Member
Survey Manager
Survey Party Chief
Survey Rodman
Survey Technician
Surveying Crew Rodman
Surveying Crew Stake Runner
Surveying Technician
Surveyor
Surveyor Chain Helper
Surveyor Helper
Surveyor Instrument Assistant
Surveyor Rod Helper
Transit Man
Transit Survey Worker
Transit Worker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$19.07 hourly, $39,670 annual.
Employment (2008):
47,000 employees